The Musée carré was designed by none other than Philippe Ledoux, who brought us so many beautiful vintage Hermès scarves.

This scarf was first issued in 1962 and pays homage to Émile Hermès‘ vast collection of art and artifacts.  The now Émile Hermès Museum, situated above the Hermès flagship store on 24 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré is unfortunately not open to the public.

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Hermès 24 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, Paris, 2013

Émile Hermès’ former offices form an impressive series of wood-paneled rooms and house his vast collection, which might at first glance seem disorganized in the sense that is so varied and ranges from lapelles to paintings, model boats and coaches, walking sticks, etchings and drawings to stirrups, spurs, elaborate bits and coin purses.

A connoisseur of beauty and esthetics, Émile surrounded himself with these very objects, which inspired not just him but the two early Hermès artists,Hugo Grygkar and Philippe Ledoux.  It was perhaps here, sitting at his desk, that Émile first conceived the idea to transform the scarf, which until then a men’s accessory, into “a must have” for every woman.  The carré as we know it, was born and Hugo and Philippe drew inspiration from Émile’s vast collection and under his careful watchful eye, carrés such as the Keys,Ludovicus Magnus and Ex Libris were born.

The Musée also reflects Ledoux’s love of the Musée National de la Marine, which he frequented often and which also inspired many of his carrés.

The Musée is a wonderful collage of all things Hermès and Ledoux.  A beautiful scarf with nautical and equestrian items and accessories making it possibly the first themed where the surf meets the turf so to speak carré (sorry Del Mar :-))